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Author Topic: Your First Kayak Transporting Experience  (Read 3332 times)

Offline The Red Rocket

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Re: Your First Kayak Transporting Experience
« Reply #31 on: September 03, 2013, 11:33:16 AM »
The first two years I transported my 2 Trident 13's on top of my VW Jetta.  Used VW roof racks and Malone J racks.  Spring 2012 I purchased a Malone trailer from Jenda and use the same J racks on this trailer. Great rig and would recommend it to anyone.

Muzz

I'd look like one of those road trains they use in the Australian outback. I'd have Le Chateau Red Rocket (pop-top trailer) behind my pickup and the yak trailer behind that. The mind boggles at the cluster**** I could get myself into trying to back up. Yowza!

Offline Muzz

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Re: Your First Kayak Transporting Experience
« Reply #30 on: September 03, 2013, 09:40:55 AM »
The first two years I transported my 2 Trident 13's on top of my VW Jetta.  Used VW roof racks and Malone J racks.  Spring 2012 I purchased a Malone trailer from Jenda and use the same J racks on this trailer. Great rig and would recommend it to anyone.

Muzz 

Offline mvarley84

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Re: Your First Kayak Transporting Experience
« Reply #29 on: August 04, 2013, 09:58:53 AM »
Due to storage constraints, I have an inflatable...takes me about 10 minutes to pump it up, and about the same to pump it out (two way pump is the best thing I ever bought for it!). I love it for back packing into some small trout ponds off the beaten path.

Offline dwc67

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Re: Your First Kayak Transporting Experience
« Reply #28 on: July 10, 2013, 06:27:57 PM »


i just made 2 sets. you can buy braid reinforced hose at a hardware store and mule or bull tape. the mule tape does not look like much but most have a 1200 lb load rate, it just does not like abrasion

Offline Dips

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Re: Your First Kayak Transporting Experience
« Reply #27 on: July 10, 2013, 06:14:55 PM »
Regarding the ratchet tie downs .. used them for a while but it's a mistake to use the non-closed hook .. one time my stern line loosened and good bye tie downs .. didn't even notice. Nowadays I use normal tie down cables.

Offline Dips

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Re: Your First Kayak Transporting Experience
« Reply #26 on: July 10, 2013, 06:12:07 PM »
I'm with Red on this one. Always use bow and stern lines. For the extra minute it takes to tie on gives me peace of mind of not losing my yak and not hurting someone else on the road.

I use these for bow and stern lines. They are $6-$10 a pair at Sail or Westmarine. Makes life a lot easier. During fishing season I usually leave them on the car when not in use.

Offline tarpon100

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Re: Your First Kayak Transporting Experience
« Reply #25 on: July 10, 2013, 04:32:01 PM »



Been out with James for quite a few times. From my observation, as the kayak is in an upside down position, the wind will be pushing the kayak down to the roof when driving, other than lifting it up in an otherwise upright position. So no bow line is needed to help holding the kayak, a stern line makes sense on emergency stop though.
Thanks "pungo". I guess as added safety measure (better safe than sorry), I'd just "throw in" this set of tie-downs that I just got, which wouldn't take too much time or effort (tie or un-tie) anyway;-)

Offline Pungo

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Re: Your First Kayak Transporting Experience
« Reply #24 on: July 10, 2013, 04:23:02 PM »



Been out with James for quite a few times. From my observation, as the kayak is in an upside down position, the wind will be pushing the kayak down to the roof when driving, other than lifting it up in an otherwise upright position. So no bow line is needed to help holding the kayak, a stern line makes sense on emergency stop though.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2013, 04:27:27 PM by mangopungo »

Offline thecrashton

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Re: Your First Kayak Transporting Experience
« Reply #23 on: July 10, 2013, 03:51:49 PM »
Yes, I am planning to do something similar. The two hooks from the Ratchet Tie Down shall be hooked to some hole under the hood, I think.

that's what i do tarpon, i pop my hood and then on each side there is a horizontal strip of metal between the outermost part of the engine bay and a rail, exactly the same spot on both sides of the car. i just hook them in there then pass the rest of the strap under the hood

Offline tarpon100

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Re: Your First Kayak Transporting Experience
« Reply #22 on: July 10, 2013, 02:41:00 PM »
With the Buick I just opened the hood and tied the rope off on each side to the structural strut holding the top of the radiator, then closed the hood with the loop on top of it and tied a short line from the loop to the bow of the yak.
Yes, I am planning to do something similar. The two hooks from the Ratchet Tie Down shall be hooked to some hole under the hood, I think.

Offline The Red Rocket

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Re: Your First Kayak Transporting Experience
« Reply #21 on: July 10, 2013, 02:38:46 PM »
With the Buick I just opened the hood and tied the rope off on each side to the structural strut holding the top of the radiator, then closed the hood with the loop on top of it and tied a short line from the loop to the bow of the yak.

Offline The Red Rocket

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Re: Your First Kayak Transporting Experience
« Reply #20 on: July 10, 2013, 02:35:28 PM »
I agree with the extra lines but if you're referring to Len, I think it was him on Hwy 10, I thought that had to do with severe crosswinds. The yak was in a J holder and acted like a sail.

You may be right but if memory serves it was an SUV with saddles. If you know how to search the forum posts properly I'm sure the thread must still be hidden in the archives somewhere.

Offline tarpon100

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Re: Your First Kayak Transporting Experience
« Reply #19 on: July 10, 2013, 12:44:41 PM »
I'm going to repeat my mantra again.

If you don't use a bow line the security of the yak/rack installation is totally dependent on the two front roof rack clips holding it to the door frame. The wind pressure coming up over the hood and under the bow of the kayak that is created by traveling at highway speed is considerable (put your hand out the window and see). A few years ago a forum member had his yak and roof rack tear right off his vehicle. Fortunately he was on a back road and no other car was around but if that happened on the 401 the possibility of causing a serious accident is extremely high if the rack breaks off and all it takes is one simple rope to prevent it.

I consider the stern line to be more to prevent the yak becoming a spear in the case of emergency braking but holding it down is good as well.

I know I sound like a broken record but be safe gang. Someone's family could be behind you if the yak/rack assembly breaks loose.

Thanks for the detailed info and advise. I will for sure head out very soon and get whatever I need to add at least a bow (and possibly a stern) tie-down.

A question. With my vehicle I don't have any hook on the front, and I assume I need to:

* Open car hood
* Unscrew some screw
* Find something with a hole to go through the screw, and then re-tie the screw (But where can I can this thing? Sorry I don't know what it is called, but I think it is a short say about-one-foot-long strap with one side with a hole to screw to the above hole on vehicle frame under hood, and with a loop on other end). Similar to this I think:


* Leave the strap's end with the loop outside/above hood permanently
* Then with a rope tie yak's bow to this loop on the end of the strap

(Sorry not sure if I made myself understood, though;-)

Thanks,
I think this problem is now solved. Just now at lunch break from work, I found and bought a pair of Ratchet Tie Downs (each with 150 lbs max. load) from a Home Depot store. Like this:



And I am ready to tie my yak this evening for tomorrow early in the morning outing (heading to Lake Simcoe for some fishin'). I may post/reply here and show you a pic on what I do with this pair of Ratchet Tie Downs...

Again, thanks 'k4l3' and 'The Red Rocket' for the great suggestions and advices;-)

Offline Scotty

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Re: Your First Kayak Transporting Experience
« Reply #18 on: July 10, 2013, 12:11:53 PM »
Additional note about locking a yak to your car ? back when I used foam bricks, I?d leave my front window open a crack, and a run heavy bike cable lock around the thwart of my Native and lock it to my steering wheel. Got a wet butt once when driving after a big rain, but that's the only issue I ever had.

These days I just lock it to the integral roof rails on my car. I live in an apt and street park in Toronto, and I?ve left the boat on my car for a week. I just loosen the straps so it won't warp in the sun, and I reckon it?s as secure there as it is in my buddy?s backyard where I usually store it.

Tho I did learn one lesson the hard way when tooling around town with boat on top: Pay close attention to height restrictions on parking garages. Yikes!

Offline Vee

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Re: Your First Kayak Transporting Experience
« Reply #17 on: July 10, 2013, 10:53:38 AM »
I'm going to repeat my mantra again.

If you don't use a bow line the security of the yak/rack installation is totally dependent on the two front roof rack clips holding it to the door frame. The wind pressure coming up over the hood and under the bow of the kayak that is created by traveling at highway speed is considerable (put your hand out the window and see). A few years ago a forum member had his yak and roof rack tear right off his vehicle. Fortunately he was on a back road and no other car was around but if that happened on the 401 the possibility of causing a serious accident is extremely high if the rack breaks off and all it takes is one simple rope to prevent it.

I consider the stern line to be more to prevent the yak becoming a spear in the case of emergency braking but holding it down is good as well.

I know I sound like a broken record but be safe gang. Someone's family could be behind you if the yak/rack assembly breaks loose.

I agree with the extra lines but if you're referring to Len, I think it was him on Hwy 10, I thought that had to do with severe crosswinds. The yak was in a J holder and acted like a sail.

 

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